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Ornament Sales To Benefit Park Lawn's Angel Fund

Standard Bank and Trust annual giving trees and ornament sales fulfill holiday wishes of developmentally disabled adults with little or no family support.

Standard Bank is rolling out the holly to deck its lobby trees and help fulfill the holiday wish lists of intellectually challenged and developmentally disabled adults served by Park Lawn.

For the third consecutive year, Park Lawn is the designated beneficiary for Standard Bank’s “Holiday Hope” ornament sale.

Donations will help purchase much-needed items for Park Lawn’s Angel Fund. The fund was created to enable Park Lawn to provide a warm, caring and loving environment for adults with multiple medical, physical and intellectual disabilities.

The ornaments sell for $1, $5 and $10. Proceeds will be used to buy Christmas presents and other every day necessities for developmentally disabled and intellectually challenged adults living at Park Lawn’s residential facilities.

Customers are invited to purchase and hang their ornaments on the Park Lawn holiday trees located in the branch lobbies.

Park Lawn residents only receive $30 to $50 a month in living expenses from Social Security. That amount doesn’t cover the cost of a winter coat, a new pair of shoes, or an evening out at a movie theater or restaurant.

For more than 60 years Standard Bank has been supporting local organizations and remains committed to investing in the communities it serves. Standard Bank realized that if it were not for the Angel Fund at Park Lawn, some of those who benefit might be left without resources to overcome their disabilities.

Past donations to the Angel Fund have been used to purchase bedroom sets, new mattresses, furniture, and maintenance and upkeep of medical equipment, as well as winter coats, boots and toiletry items.

The ornaments are on sale through Dec. 21. Standard Bank hopes to raise $5,000 for the Park Lawn Angel Fund.

Ornaments can be purchased at the following branches:

Park Lawn was founded in 1955 by local families who lobbied national and state lawmakers for funding to create educational, vocational and social programs that would enable their developmentally and intellectually challenged children to lead fulfilling and productive lives. The organization takes its name from Evergreen Park and Oak Lawn, where Park Lawn was started.

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